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Tuesday, 26 December 2017 00:00

How to Maintain Your Child’s Healthy Feet

By the time a child is 18 years old, their feet are fully developed. When a child is 6 months old, however, most of the foot consists of cartilage and may be susceptible to deformities from shoes that fit incorrectly. Recent research suggests that being barefoot is best for healthy foot development, though it may not always be practical. The skin needs to be protected from extreme weather conditions, sharp objects, and wear and tear from walking on rough surfaces. Wearing flexible shoes will allow the feet to develop naturally while protecting the skin against harsh environments. Once the proper shoes have been chosen, the feet need to be taken care of. This may include washing the feet daily, especially drying between the toes. Additionally, measuring the feet regularly in the first 3 years of walking is important in making sure children are wearing the right size shoe.

Making sure that your children maintain good foot health is very important as they grow. If you have any questions, contact one of our podiatrists of Family Foot and Ankle Center of South Jersey. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Keeping Children's Feet Healthy

Having healthy feet during childhood can help prevent medical problems later in life, namely in the back and legs. As children grow, their feet require different types of care. Here are some things to consider...

Although babies do not walk yet, it is still very important to take care of their feet.

Avoid putting tight shoes or socks on his or her feet.

Allow the baby to stretch and kick his or her feet to feel comfortable.

As a toddler, kids are now on the move and begin to develop differently. At this age, toddlers are getting a feel for walking, so don’t be alarmed if your toddler is unsteady or ‘walks funny’. 

As your child gets older, it is important to teach them how to take care of their feet.

Show them proper hygiene to prevent infections such as fungus.

Be watchful for any pain or injury.

Have all injuries checked by a doctor as soon as possible.

Comfortable, protective shoes should always be worn, especially at play.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Cherry Hill, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 18 December 2017 00:00

How the Foot is Structured

The relationship between the foot and the lower leg in motion is called foot biomechanics. When the foot is structured correctly, routine activities such as walking and running should typically occur without pain. The foot and ankle combine flexibility with support, providing functions that include shock absorption of one's body weight. Additionally, this part of the body acts as a lever during the push-off period before taking a step. There are 26 bones located in the foot and ankle; these bones are maintained by ligaments and tendons, helping the arches “give” when weight is placed on the foot. Functions of the arches include supporting the weight of the body while standing. The structure of the foot is anatomically linked, resulting in even distribution throughout the foot during weight-bearing activities.

If you have any concerns about your feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Family Foot and Ankle Center of South Jersey. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Biomechanics in Podiatry

Podiatric biomechanics is a particular sector of specialty podiatry with licensed practitioners who are trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Biomechanics deals with the forces that act against the body, causing an interference with the biological structures. It focuses on the movement of the ankle, the foot and the forces that interact with them.

A History of Biomechanics
-  Biomechanics dates back to the BC era in Egypt where evidence of professional foot care has been recorded.
-  In 1974, biomechanics gained a higher profile from the studies of Merton Root, who claimed that by changing or controlling the forces between the ankle and the foot, corrections or conditions could be implemented to gain strength and coordination in the area.

Modern technological improvements are based on past theories and therapeutic processes that provide a better understanding of podiatric concepts for biomechanics. Computers can provide accurate information about the forces and patterns of the feet and lower legs.

Understanding biomechanics of the feet can help improve and eliminate pain, stopping further stress to the foot.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Cherry Hill, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 12 December 2017 00:00

What is an Ingrown Toenail?

If you are experiencing pain, redness, and swelling near the toenail, chances are you may have an ingrown toenail. Ingrown toenails occur when the corner of the nail grows into the flesh, which can be very painful. Diabetics may be at a greater risk for ingrown toenails due to poor blood flow which can lead to the wound not healing. Trimming toenails properly is an excellent way to help prevent ingrown toenails. Wearing well-fitted shoes can help too; keeping pressure off the toes may keep the nail from growing into the surrounding tissue. Soaking the feet in a warm bath may relieve tenderness and reduce swelling, and applying antibiotic cream and bandaging the toe can also be beneficial. If the toenail becomes infected or the pain is severe, it is recommended that you see a podiatrist.

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact one of our podiatrists of Family Foot and Ankle Center of South Jersey. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Cherry Hill, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 05 December 2017 00:00

How to Avoid Toenail Fungus

Toenail fungus, also known as onychomycosis, is a relatively common health condition. Common symptoms of toenail fungus include yellow or brown nails, brittleness, or nails that may lift up from the nail bed. The fungus is contagious and can spread from nail to nail or even infect the foot and cause athlete’s foot. Without treatment, the fungus can worsen, which may be a contributing factor in experiencing pain while wearing shoes. Avoiding toenail fungus is important in maintaining healthy feet. Choosing breathable footwear, wearing proper shoes in public showers, and using foot powders to keep the feet dry can all help in avoiding toenail fungus. Keeping toenails short is also important and aids in preventing ingrown toenails. Additionally, it’s advised that shoes or nail clippers should not be shared, as this may promote spreading of the fungus. If a pedicure is desired, it’s important that the sanitation of pedicure tools occur. For all conditions related to the foot, including toenail fungus, it is important to seek help from a podiatrist.

For more information about treatment, contact one of our podiatrists of Family Foot and Ankle Center of South Jersey. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Toenail Fungus Treatment

Toenail fungus is a problem which affects many people and is hard to get rid of. Fortunately, there are several methods to go about treating toenail fungus.

Antibiotics & Treatments 

Lamisil – The most commonly effective treatment for toenail fungus. It is available as an antibiotic: Terbinafine tablet and cream. Terbinafine is a chemical component which kills fungal growth on the body. Applying regular doses will gradually kill the fungal growth. It is important to keep the area clean.

Talcum powder – Applying powder on the feet and shoes helps keep the feet free of moisture and sweat.

Sandals or open toed shoes – Wearing these will allow air movement and help keep feet dry. They also expose your feet to light, which fungus cannot tolerate. Socks with moisture wicking material also help as well.

Alternative Treatments

There are surgical procedures that are available for toenail fungus. Some people would prefer the immediate and quick removal of toenail fungus through laser surgery. Consult with yOur doctors about the best treatment options for your case of toenail fungus.  

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Cherry Hill, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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